Tru Life Turns Himself In On Murder Charge

Former Roc-A-Fella/Def Jam artist Tru Life turned himself in to authorities last night (June 23) to face a charge of 1st degree murder, according to reports.
The charge is possibly tied to a brutal stabbing incident last week that left one man seriously injured, and an 18-year old teen dead.

As reported by AllHipHop.com, police were initially investigating Tru Life’s brother for a retaliation attack in the non-fatal shooting of Michael Slater.

The individual, whom police suspect is a drug dealer, was shot in the stomach outside of club Pacha.

Several hours after the crime, police claim five gang members ambushed 30 year old Jason Black and the unnamed teen at a Manhattan apartment complex.

Both men were stabbed repeatedly in the chest and face. Black survived the assault, while the unidentified teen succumbed to his wounds.

At the time, police theorized that the back and forth violence was the result of a feud between Jason Black and Tru Life’s brother.

A 1st degree murder charge carries a maximum sentence of life in prison under New York law.

If an official or witness is not the victim, the distinction can also be decreed for murders involving multiple parties or tortuous killings.

Tru Life’s last music effort, “Wet ‘em Up,” was heard as a selection on the soundtrack to Grand Theft Auto IV.

At press time, Tru Life could not be reached for comment.

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